Arizona Flooding: Arizona counties expect more flooding as thunderstorms continue

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Arizona flooding: Continuous thunderstorms and flash floods are expected across Arizona from Wednesday morning until Thursday morning.

Arizona Flooding: Arizona counties expect more flooding as thunderstorms continue

The National Weather Service sent a warning Wednesday evening to Maricopa County residents who are seeking shelter as strong thunderstorms hit the area. Strong 40 mph winds and pea-sized hail.

According to the National Weather Service in Flagstaff, the Flash Flood Watch is expected to last until 6 a.m. Thursday. Affected areas include parts of northern and central Arizona, including Northern Gila County, Yavapai County, the Coconino Plateau, the Mogollon Rim, the White Mountains, the Oak Creek, and the Sycamore Canyons.

According to the Meteorological Service, a similar clock will be in effect until 5 a.m. Thursday in some parts of south-central and southwestern Arizona.

Scattered showers and thunderstorms and flash floods are expected, with showers of 1 to 2 inches per hour on Wednesday night. The meteorological department reported that the flow was washed away and drainage areas were likely to be below.

West of Maricopa County there has already been floods. The weather service in Phoenix is ​​concerned about favorable thunderstorms north of Maricopa and Gila County, such as Lake and Cave Creek.

Moisture and rain from Tuesday to Wednesday morning feel like remnants of Hurricane Nora, with meteorologist Brian Klimovsky saying there will be constant thunderstorms throughout the night.
A flood warning expired in Gila County just after 11:20 a.m. Wednesday after floodwaters receded in Tonto Creek, according to the Meteorological Service. Drivers are advised to observe road closures.

According to the weather service, there is a difference between a watch and an alarm. The watch is issued when conditions are favorable for a specific hazardous weather event. For example, a flood watch is issued when conditions are favorable for flooding. A flood warning is issued when or when floods occur.

According to the Meteorological Service, areas affected by wildfires can be seen flooding.

“Even in Gila County, as we have seen in the last two months, it did not take much rainfall for the areas burned by the wildfires to flood down,” said meteorologist Andrew Deemer.

1 to 2 inches of rainfall was recorded from Flagstaff to the White Mountains along the Mughal Rim. According to the weather report from the National Weather Service in Flagstaff, most counties in Mojave, southern Cocono and most of Apache, Navajo and Gila have recorded the highest rainfall so far.

Although flash flood warnings are still being issued across northern Arizona, some counties may not receive rain.
“Part of your home or valley may be dry, and conditions across the town may be completely different,” Deemer said.

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